Book Idea: Reading Challenge for 2015



Check out this fabulous Reading Challenge for 2015 from PopSugar!
If you want to read more variety in 2015, stick to this list for absolute results!

It's time to get your read on in 2015!


  

Book Review: What Am I Supposed to Do with My Life? by Johnnie Moore

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Great quote:  "Faith grows through taking steps of confidence, and chooses an attitude of optimism when everything seems to discourage it. Faith is required in nearly every moment of significant change in life, and God requires more faith when you're ready for it." (Page 74)

Book summary:  "As Moore details in the book, it is just as important to concentrate on who you're supposed to be, not just what you're supposed to do. Go until God stops you. Don't wait until He starts you."  (Thomas Nelson)

My thoughts:  When I looked at the title of Johnnie Moore's book, "What Am I Supposed to Do with My Life?" I imagined someone typing those words into a Google search. And while this important life question is certainly a valid one, doing random Google searches for the answers is exactly what this book warns against. 

Doing the right thing in your life is an important goal for most people. Christians, in particular, want to be aware of God's calling, or a chosen direction, for their actions. Moore provides advice and clarity for those who feel unsure, particularly young people just starting out in any chosen career field. Moore also warns against false beliefs when it comes to deciding how to live one's life.

This book is easy-to-read and is not filled with obscure theological debates. The intended audience of this book would want concise helpful advice and Moore has delivered.

This book really spoke to me on a personal level. Without going into too many details, I have seen firsthand how wanting to do God's will has led to severe inaction. I have witnessed a family destroyed, losing their house and their car, because that couple was doing absolutely nothing (not even working?) while waiting around for God to tell them exactly what to do. True this is radically extreme, but how many others do you know that echo shades of this inaction? How many unfilled dreams and ideas are out there because someone was hiding behind the idea that doing nothing while waiting was better than at least attempting to do something?

It might seem fabulous if God sent a messenger to your door with tickets to a faraway land because that is the calling He has placed on your life. But would it really be fabulous? Would you go on the trip because you wanted to do it or because you felt forced? Would God bless an idea you followed blindly? 

Knowing what to do with your life is a bold decision. Sometimes it's many decisions that add up to a lifetime of working towards God's will. The key throughout everything is really to just keep doing. Don't wait for a lightning bolt revelation. It quite possibly may never arrive. In the meantime, how many missed opportunities and chances might pass you by while you wait?

Rating: 4 of 5 stars


Book Facts:
  • Pages:   202
  • Year originally published: 2014
  • Author: Johnnie Moore is an author, pastor, advisor, professor of religion, and a vice president of Liberty University, the world's largest Christian university. He serves on the board of World Help, leads North America's largest weekly gathering of Christian young people, and has worked in more than two dozen nations, effecting change in some of the world's most desperate places. He and his wife, Andrea, reside in Virginia.

      
 
FTC Disclosure: Lavish Bookshelf received this product complimentary in exchange for an honest review. The opinions in this review are solely the opinion of the author. Lavish Bookshelf was not required to provide a positive review and did not receive any further compensation. Links in this post may be an affiliate link to another website. When you purchase item through an affiliate link, Lavish Bookshelf may receive monetary compensation for the referral of the sale.

Book Review: Lost in Translation by Ella Frances Sanders

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Great quote:  "Words allow us to grasp and hold onto an extraordinary amount." (Page 2)

Book summary:  Lost in Translation is compilation of words taken from languages around the world for which no true English translation exists.

My thoughts:  With charming hand-drawn pictures and a fascinating list of (very) foreign sounding words, Lost in Translation by Ella Frances Sanders is a nice little book with a lot of appeal. 

With a single word, speakers of other languages can convey thoughts and images that speakers of English would struggle to explain and understand. For example, "razliubit" is a Russian verb that describes the feeling of falling out of love with someone. The word "feuillemort" is a French word used to speak of something having the color of a faded, dying leaf. And from Germany comes the word "kabelsalat" which describes the "cable salad" found when you have a mess of tangled cables behind your computer desk or television.

Despite the charm and wit of this book, I found two glaring omissions:
  • Lacking a pronunciation guide - Not including pronunciations is an unbelievable oversight, since the words in this book are derived from languages in every corner of the globe. Anyone who wants to reads this book and incorporate these new words into their everyday vocabulary would undoubtedly want to be assured they are speaking the word correctly. 
  • No maps detailing the specific region where the word originated - While perhaps not as important as a lacking pronunciation guide, maps missing from this book is still quite a surprising omission. The region that uses some of the words is quite obvious (Sweden, Hawaii, Greece), however many of the words are from more obscure languages of the world. For example, one especially long word is noted as being from Yaghan, which is identified as an "indigenous language of distant Tierra del Fuego, Chile." A map would have informed the readers of the area where this language is spoken and more specifically identified whether that linguistic region is large or small, mountainous or near the coast, and a whole host of other interesting tidbits of information.

My favorite word in this book was "boketto" which is a Japanese idea of "gazing vacantly into the distance without really thinking about anything specific." I tend to do that a lot, but never thought of it as a specific word.  By looking at words that have no English translation, the reader can see how other cultures truly think differently.

I definitely applaud the idea of this book.  This book is a good choice for those who are interested in linguistics and travel.

Rating: 4 of 5 stars


Book Facts:
  • Pages:   112
  • Year originally published:  2014
  • Author:  You can find more information about the author and the book on the Random House website.

       
 
FTC Disclosure: Lavish Bookshelf received this product complimentary in exchange for an honest review. The opinions in this review are solely the opinion of the author. Lavish Bookshelf was not required to provide a positive review and did not receive any further compensation. Links in this post may be an affiliate link to another website. When you purchase item through an affiliate link, Lavish Bookshelf may receive monetary compensation for the referral of the sale.

Book Review: I Have Seen God by Klaus-Dieter John

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Great quote:  "Our mission hospital has also served very much as a role model for Peru by means of the loving care showered on all out patients. Nobody is discriminated against for any reason, certainly not race or social class. On the Pan-American Highway, the famous interstate that connects Lima and Cusco, there is a sign posted on the way to the hospital. It reads: "Diospi Suyana, a hospital seeking to share the love of Christ." That is truly our hearts' desire and out commitment to all people." (Page 258)

Book summary:  "Having studied at the universities of Harvard, Yale, and Johannesburg during his training as a surgeon, Dr. Klaus-Dieter John together with his wife, Dr. Martina John, a pediatrician, developed a concept for a modern hospital in the Peruvian Highlands. Turning down other offers, including a professorship, they set themselves the task of raising the millions of dollars needed. God opened the hearts and consciences of individuals and companies to create not just a health center, but a fully equipped hospital."  (LitFuse)

My thoughts:  Klaus-Dieter John felt a calling on his life as a teenager to be a missionary and a doctor in a developing country. He met and married his high school sweetheart, Martina, a woman who also felt the same calling on her life. The Johns continued through college and medical school with God's calling in mind. Once their education was completed, they were offered lucrative jobs in prestigious locations, however they both remained firm in the goals of their lives. I Have Seen God is the autobiographical book that retells their path from Germany and a world of plenty to Peru and a hospital they built from the ground up.

Despite opposition from those who felt they were "too focused" on sharing their Christian beliefs, the Johns saw many miracles where God opened doors for their message of building a state-of-the-art missionary hospital in the Peruvian highlands. Once the building project got underway, the Johns faced many more challenges however their faith in God has clearly provided the people of Peru with many medical blessings.

This book is very well-written and easy to read, perhaps even in one awe-inspiring sitting. The accompanying photos also add a lot to picturing the magnitude of what the Johns have accomplished through their trust in God. Without a doubt, the most inspirational point to be taken from this book is that God is everywhere, in the large events and even in the small mundane day-to-day ones.  


Rating: 4 of 5 stars


Book Facts:
  • Pages:    285
  • Year originally published:     2014 (English) and 2010 (German)
  • Author:   An interview of the author can be found on Radiantlit.com that provides an excellent insight into the life of Klaus-Dieter John.
  • You might want to know:   "The hospital’s name, Diospi Suyana, means “we trust in God” in Quechua, the native language of the people it serves. It is a testament to their experience that with God the impossible can happen."
  • Book Tour:   My review is part of a larger collection of reviews of this title. For more information, please visit LitFuse Publicity.


 
FTC Disclosure: Lavish Bookshelf received this product complimentary in exchange for an honest review. The opinions in this review are solely the opinion of the author. Lavish Bookshelf was not required to provide a positive review and did not receive any further compensation. Links in this post may be an affiliate link to another website. When you purchase item through an affiliate link, Lavish Bookshelf may receive monetary compensation for the referral of the sale.

Gift Idea: Support American Cancer Society's Relay for Life this season

Cancer sucks, right? 


Here's a chance to help in the 
fight against cancer while raising support for the 
American Cancer Society:






My local Relay for Life isn't until next summer, but....I am getting the word out about the Relay For Life MasterCard Gift Card. Help me earn a chance to boost my fundraising while raising money for the fight against cancer. Check it out at www.giftcards.com/relay-for-life and use my Referral Code (37770419)


Thank you!


(For every ACS gift card sold from November 1, 2014 to November 1, 2015, ACS will receive 2% of the load value of the card and for every five cards I sell, I will be entered for a chance to win a donation to my Relay for Life team up to $5000.)

Book Review: Out of the Dust - Story of an Unlikely Missionary by Avis Goodhart

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Great quote:  "When I look back on my childhood, I remember the good. I love to tell people 'Don't waste your pain.' God hasn't wasted a single bit of mine. Everywhere I go, I meet people who have suffered some of the same hard things that I did. They trust me because they know I understand. That opens the door for me to share the same good news that helped bring me out of the dust." (Page 38)

Book summary:  Avis Goodhart explains how tragedies and challenges in her life have prepared her for a life as a missionary in Central and South America.

My thoughts:  Avis Goodhart is a woman who has seen a lot of pain of suffering, both in her own past and in the lives of others. Even so, she is a missionary that is wholly focused on bringing others to Jesus and helping those as God would have her do.